Posts Tagged ‘good faith estimate’

New Year, New GFE, New Problems

January 27, 2010

As of January 1, 2010, the new, standard Good Faith Estimate (GFE) implementation was underway for all banks, lenders, and brokers was underway. The new estimate design was to clear up any misconceptions or misunderstandings about a borrowers loan terms, interest rate, closing costs, etc.

Some of the highlights of the new GFE include:

– providing a summary of the loan showing the interest rate, term, if the interest rate can rise, if the loan balance can increase even with regular monthly payments, and if there is a prepayment penalty
– showing a total fee for all services required for a loan including lender fees, attorney fees, recording fees, etc.
– containing a graph showing the fees that can’t increase for any reason at closing along with the fees that can change so long as they do not exceed a 10% tolerance limit

The benefits?  That is easy – gone are the horror stories of dramatic increases in closing costs at the closing table… no confusion about the terms of the loan… makes comparison shopping easier than before.

However, nothing in this world is perfect and there are couple of items that could use some improvement on the new GFE.

– Borrowers must receive the new GFE within 3 business days of a completed loan application. Ironically, there is not a signature page for borrowers to sign and acknowledge they received it.
– The total monthly mortgage payment for the loan is not listed anywhere on the new GFE.
– The required cash needed at closing (combination of the down payment, closing costs, and prepaids) is also not listed on the new GFE.
– The new GFE shows an itemized list of the costs for services rendered (total attorney fees, total lender fees, etc.), but does not show an itemized summary of those costs. For example, say the GFE shows the attorney fee is $1,000.  That would include the cost of the attorney’s services, title exam, title insurance, etc., but it doesn’t show the dollar amount for each of those items.

Change can be a good thing, and overall, the new GFE is a good thing for consumers and a step in the right direction. That said, it will take some time to adjust – especially for borrowers looking to buy their second or third home. This format is completely different from their prior experiences!

Be sure to work with a loan originator who knows the new good faith estimate, can explain it, but also offer you some of the missing information – like the total monthly mortgage payment!

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