Posts Tagged ‘tax deduction’

Tax season Q and A

March 2, 2010

It is upon us… one of the two guarantees in life – death and taxes. For this post, we’ll focus solely on taxes as I provide some answers to common questions I receive this time of year.

Let me start this list by stating that I am not a licensed tax professional. For information on how to file tax returns, how to write off the items listed below, etc., please consult a licensed tax professional. If you would like a referral, I know some excellent CPAs, including this one.

  • Is mortgage interest tax deductible? – Yes! Home owners are allowed to deduct interest paid on their mortgage. The IRS requires the mortgage lender to provide the documentation (form 1098) showing the interest paid by the borrower. Bottom line – check your mail and then look at Schedule A on the federal return!
  • Is mortgage insurance* tax deductible? – Possibly. Under the current tax code, mortgage insurance is tax deductible for households with adjusted gross income less than $100,000 ($50,000 for single file). The benefits begin to faze out once crossing the $100,000 ($50,000) threshold, and is entirely gone once adjusted gross income surpases $110,000 ($55,000).
  • How do I file for the home buying tax credit? – Whether a first time OR repeat home buyer (see the IRS website for complete details), anyone claiming one of these tax credits must file a paper (non-electronic) return, include a copy of the HUD-1 settlement statement, and a completed Form 5405. Note that while the form 5405 says “first time home buyer”, it is the form for both tax credits. Filing a paper return may not be as fast as an e-file, but the payoff ($8,000 or $6,500) will definitely be worth it!

While this is by no means an exhaustive list, these are by far the most common questions I’ve received this year. Remember, I’ll be glad to answer any questions and help however I can, but I am not a licensed tax professional. See a tax professional to complete and file your 2009 return.

* – Mortgage insurance is required for borrowers who buy a home with less than a 20% down payment. For conventional loans, mortgage insurance is more commonly referred to as PMI or private mortgage insurance. For FHA loans, it is known as mortgage insurance premium.